Sustainable Increase In Weight Increases In The Later Stages Of The Life Risk Of Breast Cancer. Part 2 of 3

Sustainable Increase In Weight Increases In The Later Stages Of The Life Risk Of Breast Cancer – Part 2 of 3

The researchers looked only at women who had had breast cancer and had never taken hormone replacement therapy to reduce menopausal symptoms. Hormone therapy can encourage the risk for developing breast cancer, so by looking at women who had never taken the therapy, the researchers were able to better isolate weight as an individual risk factor.

postmenopausal

Compared with women who maintained about the same weight at 50 as they had at age 20, women who gained about 30 pounds over the years increased their danger for breast cancer twofold, the study found. Among the women in the study, almost 57 percent had increased their BMI by five kilograms per meter squared (kg/m2) over 30 years. That’s akin to a women 5 feet 4 inches absurd putting on about 30 pounds.

An increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2 or more over 30 years increased the hazard of developing postmenopausal breast cancer by 88 percent, compared with women whose BMI remained stable over the same period. Among women whose BMI increased 5 kg/m2 or more from the epoch of 50 onwards, their risk for breast cancer increased 56 percent, compared with women whose BMI remained the same. That means that jumps in moment before and after age 50 boost a woman’s odds for postmenopausal breast cancer, the researchers noted.

Parts: 1 2 3

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2 Responses to Sustainable Increase In Weight Increases In The Later Stages Of The Life Risk Of Breast Cancer. Part 2 of 3

  1. Pingback: Sustainable Increase In Weight Increases In The Later Stages Of The Life Risk Of Breast Cancer. Part 1 of 3 | Paul Winkler MD

  2. Pingback: Sustainable Increase In Weight Increases In The Later Stages Of The Life Risk Of Breast Cancer. Part 3 of 3 | Paul Winkler MD

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